Life Lesson: Know Your Audience

Last night, I spent a few hours hanging out in the game room of a resort I am staying at. After acquainting myself with half a dozen other teens through some heated ping pong battles, I pitched 17 to Financially Free to them, hoping to gain some more viewers. Unfortunately, I don’t think any of them are gonna check it out anytime soon.

I told everyone about how important it is to be financially secure, and that consumer debt is severely restraining the middle class in America. I had the pleasure of watching their eyes glaze over, and eventually look back down to Snapchat stories and Instagram feeds. Even after mentioning that they can look up the mobile version of the site on their smartphones, none of them bothered to do so.

After walking back to my room, feeling defeated, I had an epiphany: Why the hell am I trying to get teenagers excited about eliminating credit card debt and living frugally? 99% of kids my age don’t care at all about financial stability; they care about spending cash and having fun! The title of the first personal finance book I ever read was “How to Be Richer, Smarter, and Better-Looking Than Your Parents”, not “The Dangers of Consumer Debt in America’s Middle Class”!

From now on, I’ll include some more exciting aspects of personal finance in my pitches: Being able to afford sweet rides, big mansions, and exotic vacations. While most members of the personal finance world don’t have these goals, it will definitely get young people excited about saving money.

The main thing I learned from this experience is to know your audience. Steve Jobs turned Apple into a technology empire by making his products appealing to millions of American consumers. The perception people have of your product or service is just as important, if not more important, than the quality of that product or service. So no matter what you are pitching, focus not only on the idea, but also on how you convey that idea.

-Andrew

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Dealing With (Stupid, Annoying, Mean, etc) People

It looks like I haven’t posted anything on this blog in three weeks… Boy, am I lazy! But I’m back, and better (actually more tired) than ever! One of the reasons for my absence has been my high school Tennis season, which requires regular travel and 2-3 hours of practice a day, 6-7 days a week. While I train year round, the expectation my school sets takes it to a whole new level. And to top it all off, my coach is a complete jerk!

He gives me a lot of advice that makes no sense, yells at me all the time, and, in my opinion, significantly depresses the potential of our team. Unfortunately, he’s not going anywhere anytime soon, since he’s not breaking any actual rules. And when he yells at me, I get a strong urge to give him a piece of my mind! I could easily tear him apart and escalate the situation to it’s breaking point.

But that isn’t the smartest thing to do. You see, when a young man disrespects an authority figure, things end badly for the former, more often than not. So instead, I suck it up and deal with the situation.

When you are dealing with mean people, you begin to look at things through an emotional lens, and start making irrational decisions. You also think that situations and events are worse than they really are. After a confrontation, instead of acting quickly and rashly, take 24 hours to cool down and look at the situation logically. If you are patient, you will likely find solutions to the problem that you didn’t see in your initial haze of anger.

If you have to deal with someone in the long term, learn to work with that person instead of making your relationship with them worse. Be respectful. Find easy things you can do to make them happy. If they’re your boss, do what they tell you to do, or at least make it look like you are doing what you’re supposed to. As the famous saying goes, keep your friends close and your enemies closer!

Have you ever had to deal with someone you couldn’t stand? If so, how did you handle it?

-Andrew